PMOs perfectly positioned to help make project products persistent

How PMOs can smooth the path of projects, to help make changes more “sticky”

Photograph of the London Eye, superimposed with the text "PMOs perfectly positioned to make project products more persistent"

A while back I attended a PMO FlashMob discussion facilitated by Ranjit Sidhu of ChangeQuest and hosted as usual by Lindsay Scott of Arras People.

This session was on how PMOs can help projects to deliver organisational change more effectively. There were several interesting take-away messages, of which I found the most interesting to be:

  • If you want a change to “stick” (without people reverting to the old way of doing things), it is just as important to get the people ready for the change (Change Management) as it is to get the change ready for the people (producing project deliverables).
  • The most successful Change projects allow stakeholders time to “grieve” for the old ways, and time to become familiar with the new ways. These projects put in consistent effort to maintain momentum on the journey from the “as is” to the “to be”, until the post-change ways become “the new normal”
  • Small pilots (preferably including some vocal objectors) can generate early successes that can be used as good news stories to spread the word and help to form positive opinions.
  • Change projects may well be asking BAU workers to carry extra work above and beyond their “day jobs” (with all its targets and objectives). During major changes, a significant proportion of people experience sufficient stress so as to pose a risk to their mental health. What can projects do to help organisations come through the Change experience still healthy?
  • Just telling people about the Change and what will happen will only get you so far. Listening to stakeholders and demonstrating what you have done with their feedback will get you much farther.

PMOs (especially PfMOs) have a unique position on the interface between the projects being carried out to effect organisational change, and the people out in the wider organisation who experience the change happening to them. So PMOs can help changes to stick by:

  • Including change management themes in project reporting (at least as a RAG category, or preferably as a measured deliverable).
  • Devising and delivering approaches to express change management as a quantified KPI.
  • Becoming the “eyes and ears” of projects; picking up informal stakeholder views on projects.
  • Project and Programme PMOs can also make change easier internally by providing good quality inductions for new project team members.

So those were the key points for me (Lindsay’s are here) from what was a very informative and useful session on how PMOs can help to make change “sticky”.

© Copyright Pragmatic PMO Ltd, first published in 2015

Managing Business Transformation – a Practical Guide (Book Review)

by Melanie Franklin, IT Governance Publishing, Ely, 152 pages,  £24.95 RRP (review copy provided free of charge by the author)
Pragmatic PMO Rating: ****

This book is intended as a practical guide to understanding and managing change that will benefit your business. It covers the differences between change management and project management, and how to integrate the two.

It starts by loosely defining change management (making a large change to a business that involves a large proportion of the organisation), and breaking it into four stages (understanding; preparing; implementing and embedding). Each chapter of the book deals with one stage before finishing with a look at the alignment of change management with the project management that underpins it.

Chapter 1 (Understanding) suggests reviewing the business case to understand the drivers for change, and comparing the “from” state with the “to” state to understand its scale. It recommends cultivating support using a vision statement as early as possible to increase participation and reduce resistance.

Chapter 2 (Preparing) proposes producing a road map to the desired final state, listing what will stop, what will continue and what will start as a result of the change. This “paves the way” for the change and smooths the transition. Plans should be built constructed in both top-down and bottom-up directions, and will not need many updates. Plans should be communicated to stakeholders often enough to ensure the message gets across, and tailored to their needs.

Chapter 3 (Implementing) describes building the change team and ensuring various team roles are represented. It discusses potential emotional reactions to the change, and offers ways to address these to help those affected to move through the change smoothly. It maintains that change managers need more “friends” than average, and offers ways to cultivate this.

Chapter 4 (Embedding) describes how the change progresses from “new” to “normal”. It recommends measuring adoption, and dismantling the old ways. This can be encouraged using financial incentives, celebration, coaching for stragglers, and a managed exit for those who cannot or will not adapt.

Chapter 5 (Alignment with project management) highlights that whilst project teams generally deliver change enablers (e.g. a new IT system), it is others that take these enablers and embed them into organisational culture. Thus the change life cycle is related to and analogous to the project life cycle, but distinct from it.

Conclusion

This book draws useful parallels between change management and project management whilst highlighting differences. The use of voices from people who have “been there” makes the advice real, and the liberal use of diagrams helps to explain the various concepts. At 152 pages this book takes <2 hours to read; with a RRP of £24.95 it is likely to pay for itself many times over with application of just a few principles. Recommended for project managers who want a better understanding of how their projects fit into the bigger picture.

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How to create a streamlined project management methodology

How do you develop a project management methodology that isn’t too heavy or too light, that respects the experience of project managers, and that is accessible? Here’s how I approached it…

How to create a streamlined PM methodology

I was made the PMO Manager of a department of about 20 project managers. Although I didn’t have responsibility for the project managers or the portfolio of projects, I did have responsibility for the methodology they were working to and for the reporting of project information to the project portfolio board (comprising most of the organisation’s senior management).

Review the “As Is” methodology

At the time I was appointed, I assumed responsibility for managing the methodology – this was a comprehensive rulebook, spanning over 125 pages and including over 30 document templates, that was updated roughly quarterly. This rulebook was generally either blindly implemented in full (by the less experienced project managers, potentially impeding project delivery) or cheerfully ignored (by the more experienced project managers, potentially increasing the risk to delivery).

Seeing that this was not an ideal situation, I reviewed the methodology to identify the key control points and templates that delivered the most value, either for the project managers or for project and portfolio stakeholders.

I involved the project managers, who helped me to identify where things were inefficient and could be improved. I asked some of them to help me develop and test-drive new improved multi-purpose templates and more efficient ways of reporting, that removed the old cut-and-paste consolidation.

Develop the “To Be” methodology in consultation with stakeholders

To improve ease of use (and uptake) I represented the entire project management approach as a process flow diagram or “framework” on a single A4 page, with hyperlinks to the latest templates for each section. I identified the steps and documents that would always be required for the type of projects generally undertaken, and made these items part of what I called the mandatory “backbone” of the new approach. Everything else I made either conditionally mandatory (depending on project dimensions such as size, risk, complexity, etc.) or fully optional elements. These optional elements could be selected from the “toolkit” or not, as the result of a discussion held early on in the project between the project manager and their line manager (who typically was responsible for the project management of a section of the project portfolio). I designed a document to record the choices made and the reasons why any optional element was though not to be relevant or useful to the project; this empowered the project manager to make choices, but also made the project manager accountable for those choices.

Implement the solution and train users

I trained the project managers in the new approach and published it on the organisation’s intranet. I encouraged project managers not to print paper copies of the guidance or templates or to re-use old completed documents, instead pointing them to the intranet site so that they would always be using the latest versions of the PM approach and the templates.

Review performance, and tune the methodology

I carried out regular post-implementation surveys and facilitated review meetings, and integrated the lessons learned into the framework. I abandoned quarterly releases of a weighty manual, instead making changes to templates and guidelines as often as these were appropriate (and informing stakeholders of the changes and why they had been made).

The new framework gave increased flexibility to project managers whilst ensuring their accountability for their project management approach. The project management community bought in to the framework as they had been closely involved in its development.

So that’s my approach to refreshing a project management methodology, learned through experience. It this approach useful to you? Let me know in the comments.

If you would like to have the benefits of an approach like this but prefer not to have to worry about this sort of techy stuff, why not talk to us about taking care of it all for you?